Media Release from Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights: 150 Canadian Social Justice Organizations Demand Sex Work Decriminalization this Election

150 Canadian Social Justice Organizations Demand Sex Work Decriminalization this Election

Monday, September 30, 2019 – Over 150 organizations across Canada are asking the next government of Canada to support sex workers’ rights, including the full decriminalization of sex work as a first step.

In 2013, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that criminalizing sex work promotes violence and violates sex workers’ human rights. Yet no action has been taken to repeal the laws and regulations that place sex workers at risk every day. The statement demonstrates unprecedented and widespread support for sex workers’ rights from social justice-seeking organizations across Canada.

On the federal level, both criminal and immigration laws contravene the safety of sex workers safety and create a hostile context with law enforcement. Since the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act came into force in 2014, sex workers have reported increased antagonism with law enforcement, targeted violence and fear of reporting, unwanted and unsolicited police interactions, and targeting of Indigenous, Black, trans, and migrant sex workers, as well as sex workers who use drugs.

Criminalization has increased surveillance of sex workers, clients, and third parties, and resulted in the same human rights violations underscored in the Bedford decision. Much of this enforcement is also due to the conflation of sex work and human trafficking, and the law enforcement responses to both.

“Every aspect of sex work is criminalized, which means that sex workers are unable to access social, legal, and health supports, should they need them,” says Sandeep Prasad, Executive Director of Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights. Adding that, “sex workers have made clear that they can’t and won’t report violence against them when they risk continued surveillance, arrest, detainment, deportation, and discrimination.”

“The conflation of sex work and human trafficking has emboldened law enforcement to misuse and overuse human trafficking laws to target sex workers, clients, and third parties,” says Jenn Clamen, National Coordinator of the Canadian Alliance for Sex Work Law Reform. “This creates a context where sex workers experience unwanted contact with law enforcement and are isolated as a result. This isolation contributes to targeted violence and lack of access to important services.”

Over 150 organizations have signed onto the statement of solidarity asking the federal government of Canada to take measures towards a first step in a process of decriminalizing sex work—a commitment to the repeal of Criminal Code and Immigration Law provisions (IRPA) that threaten sex workers’ health and safety, as well as a push to center sex workers in related policy and law reform processes.

“Ultimately, decriminalization is a first step to ensuring sex workers’ safety and dignity, which means creating spaces where they can work in a way that they feel safe and not isolated,” says Prasad.

NOTES FOR EDITORS

 

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Solidarity Statement for Sex Workers’ Rights

Sex workers—people who exchange sexual services for money or goods—are criminalized, disproportionately surveilled, overpoliced, and denied their fundamental rights. Sex workers who live intersecting discriminations due to poverty, their visible presence in public spaces, their racial and social positioning, and their gender identity are disproportionately targeted by law enforcement and institutional, legal and societal violence. Much of this treatment results from the stigmatization of sex work itself and a lack of recognition for the agency that sex workers exercise in their daily lives.

Various human rights organizations, UN bodies and courts have concluded that criminalization of the sex industry creates conditions for exploitation and violates sex workers’ human rights. In 2014, a landmark legal challenge (Attorney General v Bedford) found that the laws in Canada that address sex work violate sex workers constitutional right to safety and all such laws were struck down. However, in spite of this, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act (PCEPA) was enacted in 2014. The PCEPA defines all sex work as exploitation and frames all sex workers as victims and all clients and third parties as criminals. A primary objective of the legislation is to eradicate prostitution. The new laws include provisions that directly criminalize sex workers, as well as provisions that criminalize virtually all elements of the sex industry.

Since PCEPA came into force, sex workers have reported increased antagonism with law enforcement, targeted violence and fear of reporting, unwanted and unsolicited law enforcement of Indigenous, Black, trans, migrant, drug using sex workers, and detainment and deportations of Asian and migrant sex workers. Police misuse and overuse human trafficking laws to target sex workers and clients, creating increasingly unsafe and marginalized conditions for sex workers.

Protecting and respecting the human rights of sex workers requires a holistic response. Decriminalization—the removal of criminal and immigration sex work specific laws—is a first and necessary step. A holistic plan for sex work law reform includes concrete measures to address discrimination and inequality in all forms: poverty, inadequate housing, inadequate healthcare, lack of access to safe transportation, inadequate access to legal aid, over-criminalization and overincarceration, and ongoing problems with youth protection systems. This further includes access to basic labour and occupational safety protections.

STATEMENT OF SOLIDARITY

We are opposed to federal, provincial and municipal laws that disproportionately regulate and criminalize bodily autonomy, sexuality and sexual and reproductive health and rights.

We call upon the government of Canada for the total decriminalization of sex work as a first step to protecting and respecting the human rights of all sex workers—this begins with the removal of criminal and immigration laws that criminalize sex work.

We call for the recognition of sex work as meaningful and valuable work that provides economic opportunity for people selling and trading sex.

We call for equal and non-discriminatory access to health, education, occupation, housing, and economic opportunities and rights.

We affirm that sex workers are not criminals to be stigmatized, but rather members of an often exploited and under-protected working class.

We stand in solidarity with sex workers demanding rights, the recognition of sex workers’ agency and decision-making capacity and safe working conditions.

We, the undersigned organizations, pledge to promote the rights of sex workers and to create spaces for sex workers to take leadership and be centered in sex work law reform discussions.


National
Abortion Rights Coalition of Canada
Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights
Alberta Society for the Promotion of Sexual Health
Amnesty International Canada
Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic
Canadian AIDS Society
Canadian Association of People who Use Drugs (CAPUD)
Canadian Association of Social Workers
Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network
Canadian Treatment Action Council
Families of Sisters in Spirit
FIRST Decriminalize Sex Work
i2i Peer Support
Interagency Coalition on AIDS and Development
International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law
Marie Stopes International
Migrant Workers Alliance for Change
Radical Access Mapping Project
Sex Professionals of Canada (SPOC)
The Naked Truth
Youth Coalition for Sexual and Reproductive Rights
Adult sex work

Alberta
HIV Community Link
Prostitutes Involved Empowered Cogent Edmonton (PIECE)
Shift, HIV Community Link

British Columbia
Afro-Canadian Positive Network of BC
Anti-Violence Project
BC Coalition of Experiential Communities
Coalition Against Trans Antagonism
Downtown Eastside Women’s Centre
Downtown Eastside Sex Workers United Against Violence Society (SWUAV)
HUSTLE at Health Initiative for Men
Law Students for Decriminalization and Harm Reduction
Organize BC
Pacific AIDS Network Society
PEERS
Pivot Legal Society
Pride
Providing Alternatives, Counselling and Education (PACE) Society
Saige Community Food Bank
SFSS Women’s Centre
SOLID Outreach Society
Supporting Women’s Alternatives Network (SWAN)
UVic Gender Empowerment Centre
Victoria Sexual Assault Centre
WAVAW Rape Crisis Center
West Coast Cooperative of Sex Industry Professionals (WCCSIP)
WISH Drop-In Centre Society
YouthCO HIV & Hep C Society

Manitoba
Manitoba Harm Reduction Network
Sex Workers of Winnipeg Action Coalition

Newfoundland and Labrador
Bay St. George Status of Women Council
Corner Brook Status of Women Council
Planned Parenthood Newfoundland and Labrador Sexual Health Centre
Safe Harbour Outreach Project (S.H.O.P.)
St. John’s Status of Women’s Council/Women’s Centre
St. John’s Womxn in Music

Nova Scotia
Sexual Health Centre Lunenburg County
South House
Stepping Stone Association
The South House Sexual and Gender Resource Centre

Ontario
AIDS Committee of Ottawa
AIDS Committee of Windsor
Alliance for South Asian AIDS Prevention
Angel’s Angels
Barton Village Business Improvement Area
Butterfly Asian and Migrant Sex Workers Network
Chinese & Southeast Asian Legal Clinic
Chinese Canadian National Council Toronto Chapter
CUPE Local 3906
CUPE4600
DUAL-Drug User Advocacy League/OICH
Gender Studies & Feminist Research Program, McMaster University
Guelph Resource Centre for Gender Empowerment and Diversity
Hamilton Anvil
Hamilton Burlesque Society
HIV & AIDS Legal Clinic Ontario
Industrial Workers of the World – Hamilton GMB
LGBT YouthLine
Maggie’s Indigenous Sex Workers Drum Group
Maggie’s Toronto Sex Workers Action Project
Marit Collective
Migrant Sex Workers Project
No One Is Illegal-Toronto
Parkdale Community Legal Services
Planned Parenthood Toronto
POWER (Prostitutes of Ottawa-Gatineau Work, Educate and Resist)
Pride Hamilton
Safer Gigs Hamilton
SafeSpace
Sex Workers Advisory Network of Sudbury (SWANS)
Sex Workers’ Action Network of Waterloo Region
Sex Workers’ Action Program of Hamilton
SHORE Centre
Showing Up for Racial Justice Toronto (SURJ TO)
Street Health
TransParent Hamilton-Niagara
Willow’s Drop-In – Ottawa-Vanier
Women & HIV / AIDS Initiative
Women and Gender Equity Network
Women’s and Gender Equity Centre at University Toronto-Mississauga
Work Safe Twerk Safe
Workers’ Action Centre
YWCA Kitchener-Waterloo

Québec
Action Santé Travesties et Transexuel(le)s du Québec (ASTTeQ)
Agir
AlterHéros
CACTUS Montreal
Centre for Gender Advocacy
Clinique Droits Devant
Coalition des organismes communautaires québécois de lutte contre le sida (COCQ-SIDA)
Coalition LGBTQ youth groups
Conseil québécois LGBT
Dopamine
École de travail social UQAM
Émissaire
Fédération des femmes du Québec (FFQ)
GIAP
Les Hébergements de l’Envol
L’R des centres de femmes du Québec
Native Women’s Shelter
PACT de rue
Plein Milieu
Project 10
Projet d’intervention auprès des mineur.e.s prostitué.e.s (PIaMP)
Projet Lune
RÉZO
Sidalys
Solidarity Across Borders- Montreal
Spectre de rue Inc.
Stella, l’amie de Maimie
The Open Door / La Porte Ouverte Montréal
TOMS Table des organismes communautaires montréalais de lutte contre le VIH/sida

Saskatchewan
Saskatoon Sexual Health

 

Stay informed this Federal Election with our Sex Work on the Hill Advocacy Guide

THE FEDERAL ELECTIONS PERIOD IS  OFFICIAL and the elections are coming up on October 21, 2019. The elections can be very disempowering for sex workers, as we come into contact with the systems of power that repress us in so many ways. Some of us vote, some of us can’t vote, and some of won’t vote. But it is important for us to know about the things going on around us, so we can decide how we want to engage.

The Canadian Alliance for Sex Work Law Reform created this handy little guide about the elections that explains a lot about the process:

http://sexworklawreform.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Advocacy-Guide-PART-III-English.pdf

It even has political party positions on sex work within it (there are updates to the Liberal and Green Party “official positions” not included in this guide but added below).

If you have any questions about the elections or just want to chat about it, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.

***

LES ÉLÉCTIONS FÉDÉRALES auront lieu le 21 octobre 2019. Les élections peuvent être très décevantes pour les travailleuses du sexe, car nous entrons en contact avec les systèmes de pouvoir qui nous répriment de nombreuses façons. Certains d’entre nous votent, d’autres ne peuvent pas voter et d’autres ne votent pas. Mais il est important pour nous de savoir ce qui se passe autour de nous afin de pouvoir décider de la manière dont nous voulons nous engager.

L’Alliance canadienne pour la réforme des lois sur le travail du sexe a créé ce petit guide pratique sur les élections qui en explique beaucoup sur le processus.

http://sexworklawreform.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Guide-dActivisme-PARTIE-III-français.pdf

Il contient même des positions de parti politique (il y a des mises à jour des «positions officielles» sur le travail du sexe du Parti Vert et des Libéraux qui ne figurant pas dans ce guide mais sont en bas).

Si vous avez des questions sur les élections ou si vous souhaitez simplement en discuter, n’hésitez pas à nous contacter.

***

UPDATED PARTY RESOLUTIONS 2019

Liberal Party Resolution, passed in April 2018 at the Halifax Liberal Party Convention

Decriminalization of Consensual Sex Work and Sex Trade

WHEREAS the current Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act, which prohibits the purchasing of sex, does little to protect sex workers and instead pushes them to work underground and in dangerous conditions.

WHEREAS the current prohibition of buying consensual sex work does not address theunderlying issues that make sex work dangerous, but rather creates a climate that makes sex workers unlikely to work with the police and be involved with more serious crimes.

BE IT RESOLVED that the Liberal Party of Canada should repeal the 2014 Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act, begin a consultation period with those in the sex work industry and advocacy groups, and move to decriminalize consensual sex work, and the purchase of said sex work, for those over the age of 18.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Liberal Party of Canada should consult not just with those involved in the sex work, but with surrounding communities to ensure that these changes ensure the safety and wellbeing of these surrounding communities and their families.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that along with decriminalization the Liberal Party of Canada should look to address the true problems facing sex workers by working to increase their access to sexual health clinics, counseling and improve their relationship with local authorities.

 

**

Décriminalisation du travail consensuel du sexe et du commerce du sexe

ATTENDU QUE :

  • la version actuelle de la Loi sur la protection des collectivités et des personnes victimes d’exploitation, qui interdit l’achat de services sexuels, n’apporte que peu de protection aux travailleuses du sexe et, au contraire, les pousse à travailler dans la clandestinité et dans des conditions dangereuses;
  • l’interdiction actuelle visant l’achat de services sexuels consensuels ne traite pas des problèmes sous-jacents qui rendent le travail du sexe dangereux, mais, au contraire, crée un climat qui incite les travailleuses du sexe à ne pas collaborer avec la police et à être impliquées dans des infractions plus graves.

IL EST RÉSOLU ​que le Parti libéral du Canada abroge la Loi sur la protection des collectivités et des personnes victimes d’exploitation de 2014, entame une période de consultation avec les travailleuses de l’industrie du sexe et leurs groupes de défense, et s’engage à décriminaliser le travail consensuel du sexe et l’achat desdits services sexuels pour les personnes âgées de plus de 18 ans.

IL EST RÉSOLU que le Parti libéral du Canada ne consulte pas uniquement les travailleuses de l’industrie du sexe, mais aussi les résidents des collectivités environnantes pour faire en sorte que ces modifications garantissent la sécurité et le bien-être des résidents de ces collectivités et de leur famille.

 

IL EST EN OUTRE RÉSOLU que, parallèlement à la décriminalisation, le Parti libéral du Canada cherche à résoudre les problèmes de fond auxquels sont confrontées les travailleuses du sexe en prenant des mesures visant à améliorer leur accès aux cliniques de santé sexuelle et au counseling, ainsi qu’en cherchant à améliorer leurs relations avec les autorités locales.

Green Party Resolution, passed at the 2018 Green Party Convention and was ratified by an online vote in February 2019.

G18-P010 SAFETY FOR SEX WORKERS

“The GPC supports labour rights for sex workers to ensure that those
working in the industry are able to control their working conditions,
conduct business in a safe and healthy environment, and have recourse
to legal remedies where these conditions are not provided.”

Media Release: Sex worker rights groups mark Canada’s Human Trafficking Awareness Day with scathing response to Justice Committee Report: Warns of harms to sex workers

Media Release

Sex worker rights groups mark Canada’s Human Trafficking Awareness Day with scathing response to Justice Committee Report: Warns of harms to sex workers

February 22, 2019 – To mark February 22nd, Canada’s Human Trafficking Awareness Day, sex worker rights groups across the country are highlighting the harms of anti-human trafficking efforts in response to the report from the House of Commons Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights released December 2018, Moving Forward in the Fight Against Human Trafficking in Canada. The final recommendations from the Committee’s report ignore the evidence provided by sex worker rights groups on the harmful impacts of anti-human trafficking efforts and fail to recognize sex workers as the primary targets of anti-human trafficking initiatives, and therefore as important stakeholders in Canada’s human trafficking response.

While the Committee explicitly states that it “does not take any position regarding the legalization or decriminalization of prostitution or the relationship between the sex industry and human trafficking as this is beyond the scope of this study,” their failure to concretely distinguish between sex work and human trafficking and to position itself on the human rights of sex workers has resulted in a series of recommendations that will lead to human rights violations against sex workers.

Throughout the consultation and across the country, sex worker rights groups and our allies provided clear, consistent data and submissions that demonstrated how anti-human trafficking discourse, policy and policing has caused — and continues to cause — human rights violations against people working in the sex industry. Sex worker rights groups were also clear to distinguish human trafficking from sex work not only in practice and in the language used to accurately reflect people’s experiences, but in policy recommendations as well. When sex work is conflated with human trafficking, sex workers and the people they work with are indiscriminately targeted for surveillance and investigation. Sex workers experience this over-policing as antagonistic and as a result often do not report to or seek out law enforcement if they need to. Sex workers may experience many types of violence and exploitation, but whether or not this is related to trafficking, none are adequately addressed through current policy and practice.

Sex work-specific criminal and immigration prohibitions are barriers to meaningfully addressing human trafficking. While sex work and human trafficking are profoundly different, they are conflated in legislation, policy and practice. Addressing human trafficking thus requires a review of both criminal and immigration laws and the ways in which human trafficking laws are currently being enforced in a way that threatens sex workers’ safety, security and agency.

See our full response and recommendations for a human rights-based approach to human trafficking at: http://sexworklawreform.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/CASWLR-Human-Trafficking-Response.pdf

Download PDF

Contact our email for further comment: contact@sexworklawreform.com

The Canadian Alliance for Sex Work Law Reform formed in 2012 and is composed of sex worker rights and allied groups and individuals in cities across Canada: Calgary, Edmonton, Hamilton, London, Longueuil, Montreal, Kingston, Québec, Sault Ste. Marie, St. John’s, Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria, and Winnipeg. Members work together to fight for sex work law reform, sex workers’ rights, and community well-being. Its member groups include: Angel’s Angels (Hamilton); Action Santé Travesties et Transexuel(le)s du Québec (ASTTeQ) (Montréal); BC Coalition of Experiential Communities (Vancouver); Butterfly Asian and Migrant Sex Workers Network (Toronto); Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network (Toronto) Downtown Eastside Sex Workers United Against Violence (SWUAV) (Vancouver); Émissaire (Longueuil); FIRST (Vancouver); Maggie’s Toronto Sex Workers Action Project (Toronto); Maggie’s Indigenous Sex Workers Drum Group (Toronto); Migrant Sex Workers Project (Toronto); PEERS (Victoria); Projet Lune (Québec); Prostitutes Involved Empowered Cogent Edmonton (PIECE) (Edmonton); Providing Advocacy, Counselling & Education (PACE) Society (Vancouver); Rézo, programme travail du sexe (Montréal); Safe Harbour Outreach Project (S.H.O.P.) (St John’s); Safe Space (London); Sault Ste. Marie Sex Workers’ Rights (Sault Ste. Marie); Sex Professionals of Canada (SPOC) (Toronto); Sex Workers Advisory Network of Sudbury (SWANS) (Sudbury); Stella, l’amie de Maimie (Montreal); Stop the Arrests! (Sault Ste. Marie) Strut! (Toronto); Supporting Women’s Alternatives Network (SWAN)(Vancouver); Shift (Calgary); West Coast Cooperative of Sex Industry Professionals (WCCSIP) (Vancouver); Sex Workers of Winnipeg Action Coalition (Winnipeg).

CEDAW, February 2019

"On the occasion of its 72nd session, to be held in Geneva from 18 February to 8 March 2019, the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women will hold a half-day of general discussion on trafficking in women and girls in the context of global migration in the framework of the provisions of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. The half-day of general discussion has been organized by OHCHR.

The purpose of the half-day of general discussion is to prepare the elaboration by the Committee of a General Recommendation on trafficking in women and girls in the context of global migration. The aim of the general recommendation will be to provide guidance to States parties to the Convention on the measures they should adopt to ensure full compliance with their obligations to respect, protect and fulfil women’s human rights in the context of trafficking and global migration."

All written submissions, including ours from the Canadian Alliance for Sex Work Law Reform, can be found online here: https://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/CEDAW/Pages/GRTrafficking.aspx

Download PDF 

 

 

Media Release: Current Anti-Human Trafficking Initiatives Harm Sex Workers

Media Release

Current Anti-Human Trafficking Initiatives Harm Sex Workers

January 11, 2019 – To mark January 11th, National Human Trafficking Awareness Day, sex worker rights groups across the country are highlighting the harms of anti-trafficking efforts. Sex workers, clients and third parties are the best positioned to identify and stop human trafficking in the sex trade but are prevented from doing so by criminal sex work laws and immigration regulations.

When sex work is conflated with human trafficking, sex workers and the people they work with are indiscriminately targeted for surveillance and investigation. Colleagues, employers, family members, and even sex workers are often mistakenly identified as traffickers, and third parties, who play important roles to help organize income, communicate with clients, offer additional security precautions or advertise sex workers’ services, are criminalized. Sex workers experience this over-policing as antagonistic and as a result often do not report to or seek out law enforcement if they need to. Sex workers may experience many types of violence and exploitation – and whether related to or unrelated to trafficking – none are adequately addressed through current public policy and practice. The conflation of sex work and human trafficking harms sex workers, including those who have been trafficked.

All sex workers are impacted by anti-human trafficking efforts. As part of their efforts to “locate” trafficked individuals, law enforcement agencies across Canada regularly participate in mass, sweeping efforts such as Operation Northern Spotlight. These efforts, where undercover officers pose as clients, continue to erode trust and increase suspicion between sex workers and law enforcement and are often informed by non-evidence-based and racist understandings of the sex industry.

Criminal and immigration sex work prohibitions are barriers to meaningfully addressing human trafficking. While sex work and human trafficking are profoundly different, they are conflated in legislation, policy and practice. Addressing human trafficking thus requires a review of both criminal laws and the way in which human trafficking laws are currently being enforced in a way that threatens sex workers’ safety, security, and agency.

Sex workers are essential to any campaign or initiative targeting human trafficking. Sex workers can not only facilitate access to people that may be victimized or exploited, but some sex workers are well-positioned to identify traffickers and could aid police if they were genuinely respected as partners in addressing human trafficking. Anti-human trafficking initiatives that harm sex workers create further barriers for sex workers to engage in human trafficking prevention.

The Canadian Alliance for Sex Work Law Reform makes the following recommendations for a human rights-based approach to preventing human trafficking:

• Recognize that sex workers and sex worker rights organizations are best placed to support sex workers who are experiencing human rights violations because they are in constant contact with people working in the sex industry.

• Invest in community initiatives run by and for people working in the sex industry that are non-directive and support sex workers’ human rights.

• Remove laws that increase sex workers’ contact with police, or laws that mandate police to monitor sex workers and work spaces. This includes sex work-specific criminal laws, including provisions introduced through the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act and immigration regulations and work permit conditions that prohibit migrant people from working in the sex industry.

• Stop unsolicited visits and raids of sex work spaces, detention and deportation of sex workers and ensure that the Canada Border Services Agency is never involved in anti-trafficking investigations.

• Recognize that sex work is work and eliminate discrimination against sex workers. Support sex workers’ rights, and justice, and the right not to be “rescued”.

See our full recommendations below in our submission to the Subcommittee on Justice and Human Rights, Human Trafficking Consultation

The Canadian Alliance for Sex Work Law Reform formed in 2012 and is composed of sex worker rights and allied groups and individuals in cities across Canada: Calgary, Edmonton, Hamilton, London, Longueuil, Montreal, Kingston, Québec, Sault Ste. Marie, St. John’s, Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria,
and Winnipeg. Members work together to fight for sex work law reform, sex workers’ rights, and
community well-being. Its member groups include: Angel’s Angels (Hamilton); Action Santé Travesties et
Transexuel(le)s du Québec (ASTTeQ) (Montréal); BC Coalition of Experiential Communities (Vancouver);
Butterfly Asian and Migrant Sex Workers Network (Toronto); Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network (Toronto) Downtown Eastside Sex Workers United Against Violence (SWUAV) (Vancouver); Émissaire (Longueuil); FIRST (Vancouver); Maggie’s Toronto Sex Workers Action Project (Toronto); Maggie’s Indigenous Sex Workers Drum Group (Toronto); Migrant Sex Workers Project (Toronto); PEERS (Victoria); Projet Lune (Québec); Prostitutes Involved Empowered Cogent Edmonton (PIECE) (Edmonton); Providing Advocacy, Counselling & Education (PACE) Society (Vancouver); Rézo, programme travail du sexe (Montréal); Safe Harbour Outreach Project (S.H.O.P.) (St John’s); Safe Space (London); Sault Ste. Marie Sex Workers’ Rights (Sault Ste. Marie); Sex Professionals of Canada (SPOC) (Toronto); Sex Workers Advisory Network of Sudbury (SWANS) (Sudbury); Stella, l’amie de Maimie (Montreal); Stop the Arrests! (Sault Ste. Marie) Strut! (Toronto); Supporting Women’s Alternatives Network (SWAN)(Vancouver); Shift (Calgary); West Coast Cooperative of Sex Industry Professionals (WCCSIP) (Vancouver); Sex Workers of Winnipeg Action Coalition (Winnipeg).

Contact our email for further comment:
contact@sexworklawreform.com